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TREE HOPPER

Originally the ‘Tree hopper’ was aimed to support the city (and it’s inhabitants), overwhelmed with permanent rush and luck of time, due to significant commuting and inefficient urban space organization. However, while the design process, the concept evolved to become an inspiring ‘vehicle’, with potential to be both local and even global solution.

Finding a moment to connect with nature within the endless expanding envelopes of our global cities is becoming a rarity, even though increasing webs of transport infrastructure allow us to reach secluded peaceful natural environments with greater ease. The issue lies not in connectivity but rather the pattern of the urban dwellers lifestyle, being consumed by the journey to work, working day and the journey back home. On average, commuting and work occupy 20% of our time. Necessitated by survival, these defining components in our lives are physically shaping our cities, the way they function and even our personal living patterns.

‘Tree hopper’ is a response to being particularly interested in this transitional time space between commuting time and working time. Here lies the opportunity to tip the balance between the routine everyday and the moments that respond to our alterior senses encouraging much needed down time and ultimately happiness. We focus on practical and feasible solutions that improve people’s lives through the creation of positive sustainable urban environments.

DIAGRAM 1 presents one way commuting time & carbon footprint DIAGRAM 2 presents mankind increase to 2050 according to UN

‘Tree hopper’ is a new public city infrastructure that allows you to disconnect from the city – in the city. It combines the satisfaction of pitching your own tent with the excitement of occupying a tree
canopy at the convenience of strolling to the park next door.

DIAGRAM presents London Centre map – arrangement of the ‘Tree Hoppers’ where walking distance from any location to the closest TH is not further than 12min

The system provides a network of selected ‘host trees’ across parks and green spaces in London consisting of a structural frame with integrated stairs and services that accommodate specifically designed personally owned‘tree tents’, available to the public in any outdoor store. A tree finder app points you to the nearest available docking tree and you simply hop to the location climb up the docking station and pitch your tent to stay in the tree canopy.

SCHEME presents axonometric view

The cacoon shaped docking structure has been designed with the structural laws common to nature and in particular with flora and fauna utilising the Fibonacci principles. This allows it to be adapted to the selected tree trunk and height. All vertical loading is taken by the structure and the tree trunk is only utilised for lateral stability. This allows the structure to flex and sway with the tree. Usb power to the tree tents and Wi-Fi are integrated in to the frame.

SCHEME presents tree tent detail

The 2 part ‘tree tent’ consists of an inflatable structural base cushion that attaches itself to the docking frame at specific points. This creates a cantilever out from the structure and forms the sleeping/resting floor of the tent. A light hood then attaches to form a weather cover with integrated flexible carbon fibre poles to hold the form in tension.

DRAWINGS : plans, elevation & section

Source: cargocollective

Modern Extension House will inspire you

Day Bukh Architects have made an extension to a semi-detached home in Sydney, Australia.
The back extension with wood slats cantilevers from the house and provides shade for the small patio below.

The Grand Old Lady of Melbourne’s Abbotsford


The Grand Old Lady wasn’t looking at her best when Techné got to work, and the brief was to give the place a thorough overhaul while still retaining plenty of the old character.

In this spirit the 1923 heritage protected façade was restored, while retaining the well-known green paint job, and old parts of the interior have been replaced with modern interpretations; an example is the Art Deco front bar. Never a place to take itself too seriously, The Terminus has continued in that vein by adding the kitsch Paris Tropical upstairs bar. The encroachment of high-rise building all around had started to choke the neighbourhood a bit, so Techné decided to combat this by adding a lush green garden area in which locals could escape the surrounding concrete jungle.


Punters can rest assured that the beer is up to snuff as well, as the unpasteurised Carlton Draught on tap here comes straight from the brewery located just two minutes down the road. Here’s to the return of the Grand Old Lady.

Source: we-hearth

Dazzeling four small pool designs that are making waves

For a northern people, Canadians sure do love their swimming holes, even if they use them only a few months every year. What’s also notable when it comes to pool design is the wide range of examples dotting our cities. Here are four of the most inventive, from a raised stunner on the West Coast to small-space beauties in Toronto

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